Tag Archives: octomore

Interview and tasting with Bruichladdich Head Distiller Adam Hannett

Bruichladdich has long been an Axis favorite. We admire the Islay distillery for their blend of iconoclasm and tradition, their sense of adventure–and most of all for their malt.

Bruichladdich Head Distiller Adam Hannett brought all of this with him on a recent U.S. tour. Thane, J.T. and I had the great pleasure of catching up with him in Chicago.

It’s hard not to start with the obvious question: How did a man of his tender years reach such lofty heights so soon? (Adam’s in his mid-30s, but could still be mistaken for a university student.)

Adam Hannett
Photo from bruichladdich.com

“To be honest, I worked hard,” he said. “I wanted to be there. I had a passion for it.” That said, “I recognize I’m very fortunate.”

An Islay native, Adam started work at Bruichladdich as a tour guide in 2004 after dropping out of university. He remembers being given a bottle of Murray MacDavid GlenDronach at the end of his first day as part of his single malt education. It was a very good bottle.

“I was hooked,” Adam said.

Then-master distiller Jim McEwan and General Manager Duncan McGillivray became mentors, feeding Adam’s growing hunger to learn every aspect of the craft and the business.

He first voiced his larger ambitions at a Bruichladdich Christmas party “after a couple of drams.” He was several years into his tenure at the time, and working in Bruichladdich’s warehouses. Then-CEO Mark Reynier (who founded Bruichladdich in 2000 and left in 2012) asked Adam about his long-term goals.

“I’d like to be manager,” Adam said. Somewhat to his surprise, Mark replied: “You should do it!”

It was a reflection of Bruichladdich’s ethos of “creating opportunities for young people, for local people. The approach is: Go for it! Give them a chance!” Adam noted Allan Logan as another example: Logan rose from “shoveling shit” as a groundsman in 2001 to being Distillery Manager at age 28–the youngest in Scotland–and is now Production Manager.

Allan Logan and Adam Hannett
Allan Logan and Adam Hannett. Photo by bruichladdich.com

Adam is now two years into his time as Head Distiller. What has it been like filling the shoes of Jim McEwan, a 50-year industry veteran and whisky legend?

“The honest answer is: I try not to think about it,” Adam said. “Jim said to me, ‘You’re your own man. You’ll do it your own way.'”

Speaking of which. Adam was eager to share his first four releases while we talked. Fittingly, three of them were 10-year-old bottlings of whisky that came off the stills in 2006, when Adam began distilling: the Laddie 10 Second Edition, Port Charlotte 10, and Octomore 10 Second Edition.

Bruichladdich 10s
Photo from bruichladdich.com

“It’s amazing to see the journey the spirit’s gone on from being a blank slate,” he said. “And it’s quite special because of the journey I’ve been on myself.”

What a way to begin! All three are bottled at a hefty 50% ABV.

The Laddie 10 Second Edition is the comeback of a release so beloved that Bruichladdich couldn’t keep it on the shelves. It was discontinued in 2014. (I’ll confess to doing my small part in contributing to the shortage.)

The new Laddie is every bit a worthy successor, and has a heft and density that set it apart from the no-age-statement Classic Laddie. The unpeated malt was matured in 60% first-fill bourbon, 20% second-fill sherry, and 20% second-fill Syrah casks.

I got banana chips on the nose. Orange saltwater taffy. Vanilla and jasmine. On the palate, lemon custard and creme brulee. Buttery texture. Grape brandy. Very subtle smokiness–from the oak char, not peat–on the finish.

The Port Charlotte 10 is all about “sweet and smoke,” as McEwan would tell Adam. It’s peated at 40 ppm–a healthy level, though sub-Ardbeg and well below Bruichladdich’s Octomore. Matured in a mix of first-fill bourbon, sherry, Tempranillo, and French wine casks.

The nose is quite light at first, with caramelized banana, Meyer lemon, and buttery biscuits. The palate has sweet toasted grain, toffee, and distinct but still subtle peat prickle. The finish is earthy and warming, with the peat taking a turn toward the bonfire.

The Octomore 10 Second Edition is one of the oldest of the notorious cask-strength peat monsters. (A previous 10-year-old release came in 2012.) Peated to 167 ppm, matured in first-fill bourbon and second-fill Grenache Blanc casks, bottled at cask strength of 57.3% ABV.

Naturally, any Octomore is going to lead with the peat. But it’s fascinating how much the extra time does to tame the beast. (Other things being equal, the younger a peated whisky is, the brasher is tends to be.) The nose on the Octomore 10 Second Edition leads with creamy, buttery vanilla, followed by morello cherries, and a tickle of the peat that will rush forth on the palate. The palate also has toasted sweetbreads, and the peat twines with cinnamon spice. The very long finish adds sweet barbecue pork.

To my palate, all three 10-year-olds were and are unequivocal successes.

Then Adam brought out the bottle that kept him up at night.

Jim McEwan took special pleasure in brewing up a periodic limited release called Black Art, for which he would disappear into the warehouses and emerge with a very mature, cask strength bottling that no one else at Bruichladdich had the recipe to.

Bruichladdich Black Art

“It was Jim’s creation,” Adam said. “It was his baby.” Naturally, when Adam set out to make his own Black Art, “I approached it with trepidation. To follow Jim, it’s got to be the best thing you can do.”

It was a true passing of the torch when Jim approached Adam one day in 2015, jotted down the secret proportions on a post-it, and handed it over.

And what could’ve been more in the Bruichladdich spirit than Adam’s thanking him, then tossing out the recipe so he could make a Black Art that was truly his own?

The Black Art 5th Edition is unpeated and bottled at 48.4% ABV. It’s a massively complex, coiled, enigmatic dram. Like previous Black Arts, it draws on malt distilled in the pre-Reynier/McEwan era, before the distillery was shuttered in 1993 (to be reopened by Reynier 2000).

Those old stocks have their eccentricities, Adam said. “They were working with old, imperfect casks. The spirit was excellent, but the casks were poor. They needed to be recasked, which Jim set about doing. His approach was to add layers.”

It shows. The nose is dense, with sherry and dry red wine notes predominating. The age is unmistakable, but there’s a freshness to the dark berry scents that’s a welcome surprise. The palate is dark and brooding, with mushrooms, old leather, and decaying parchment. The finish takes you from the library to the wine cellar, with cool wet clay and old-barrel funk. And like the best older malts, it constantly evolved and unfolded in the glass.

Not a beginner’s whisky, but one I loved–and I actually preferred to Jim McEwan’s Black Art 4. The memory of it stayed with me for days.

Back at the start of Adam’s whisky journey, his father encouraged him to take that first tour-guide job with Bruichladdich. “He said, ‘You’ll get a free bottle of whisky every month if nothing else.'”

He’s gotten much more than that. And so have we.

Cheers, friends! – BO

Thanks to Bruichladdich for the opportunity to interview Adam Hannett and sample the four whiskies mentioned above. As always, our opinions are 100% our own.

Bruichladdich Octomore 7.4 Virgin Oak Review

Distiller: Bruichladdich. Region: Islay. ABV: 61.2%. Age: 7 years. Price: $250.

One word could sum up the Bruichladdich Octomore 7.4 tasting event I attended in Chicago: unforgettable. Islay-born and raised head distiller Adam Hannett was in my home city to launch the United States arrival of the newest Octomore–the 7.4 Virgin Oak.

I’ve been drinking Octomore since edition 1.1, and have experienced the bold innovation that has been showcased in each subsequent release, but the 7.4 takes Octomore to a whole new place. This is a bottle of superlatives suited for the adventurous.

This inaugural 7-year-old release is bottled at 61.2% ABV, with 25% of the liquid matured the full seven years in French virgin oak casks, and 75% matured three years in classic first-fill bourbon casks, then 2 years in virgin oak, before a final 2 years again spent in first-fill bourbon casks.

The 7.4 has a familiar nose of powerful smoke, which you’d expect with it being peated to 167 ppm, but that’s where the familiarity ends. Unique sweet BBQ notes from the virgin oak reveal themselves and balance the smoke. On the palate the sweetness transitions to lovely dried fruits with rich oak and spice. The distinctive mix of sweet smoke and spice continue on the finish, and as the oak fades you’re left where you started, with lingering smoke.

This powerful Octomore is unlike any of its predecessors, and recommended for anyone looking to go where no Octomore has gone before. Cheers! – JTR

Buy Bruichladdich whisky online at Mash + Grape

Bruichladdich kindly provided a sample for review. As always, our opinions are 100% our own.

Bruichladdich Port Charlotte Islay Barley Review

Bruichladdich Port Charlotte Islay Barley – Distillery: Bruichladdich. Region: Islay. ABV: 50%. Age: 6 years. Price: $60.

There’s a special place in my heart for Bruichladdich, and always will be. My first taste of the dear departed Laddie 10, my first taste of the volcanic Octomore, an epic night with J.T. sampling oddities and rarities like the Bruichladdich Yellow Submarine, sipping the Black Art on a hotel balcony overlooking Italy’s Lake Garda with Thane out better halves…this endlessly innovative Islay distillery has been bringing me some of my most memorable whisky moment for years.

Every chance to try a new ‘Laddie is a pleasure. This 2008 Port Charlotte Islay Barley was no exception.

Bruichladdich takes barley provenance seriously. Their tagline is “terroir matters”–terroir being the expression of aspects of a specific place in the qualities of a wine or spirit.

The core of the 2008 Port Charlotte for me is an underlying creaminess that recalls the Islay barley Octomores, like the magnificent Octomore 6.3. It starts on the nose. Sour cream pound cake. A little candied lemon. Wild strawberry. A little fuzzy peat at the fringes, but very mild. Bruichladdich calls this “Heavily Peated,” but at 40ppm, it’s below Ardbeg’s usual 55ppm, and WAY below the Octomores’ 150-250ppm+.

The palate starts with some sweet peat, but it’s still restrained. Marzipan. Medium-light body, but reasonably substantial for its age (6 years). Strawberry shortcake. With a few drops of water, the peat comes alive, prickles. Campfire and graham crackers, balanced by flickers of citrus. The finish is pleasant but on the shorter side. Leaves you wanting more, and pouring more.

A very approachable young Islay, creamy and bright at once, with excellent balance. Bottled at a healthy 50% ABV and sold at a very fair $60. I’d recommend it to anyone.

Happy Thirsty Thursday, friends! – BO

A company representative graciously provided a sample for review. As always, our opinions are 100% our own.

Buy Bruichladdich whisky online at Mash + Grape

Lost Spirits Seascape Single Malt Review

Distiller: Lost Spirits. ABV: 65%(!) Age: 4 years. Price: $55

There are few distillers anywhere as wild and innovative as Lost Spirits’ Bryan Davis. The story, as I heard it, is that he and his wife Joanne were living in Spain and running a small absinthe distillery when they had their first taste of Bruichladdich’s Octomore. It was a revelation. Bryan had a thought: Why couldn’t there be an American Octomore? Not a copy, but something as wild, bold, and brawny, made with native ingredients on native soil — say that little scrap of family land they had waiting for them an hour south of San Francisco?

So goes the legend of the Mad Scientist of Monterey, CA.

Here’s one of his monsters. The Seacape may be, in its own way, the closest think I can imagine to an American Octomore. It’s a single malt from peated barley, aged four years in Lost Spirits’ own Navy Rum casks. An explosion of campfire, iodine, tons of salt — no surprise given the barley was fermented in Pacific Ocean water — and a certain patented Lost Spirits funk.

Best tried in small doses and side-by-side with others in their line. Even then, they’re only for the adventurous. But I’m awfully glad they’re out there. (When you can find them, that is — Lost Spirits has focused almost exclusively on making overproof rums in recent years, which are excellent in their own way.)

Hats off, Bryan. Please keep ’em coming! – BO